Thursday, May 13, 2010

MFIoF Podcast #1 - "What Is Veganism?"

In this podcast, I asked "What Is Veganism?" to come up with a starting point for future discussions.

Apologies in advance for the technical glitches -- it'll all get better! If you listen closely, you can hear Sammy-cat scolding me at one point during the recording for not paying attention to him.

5 comments:

LiveVegan said...

Excellent Mylene. I look forward to more. Thanks :-)

Paola said...

Really enjoyed the podcast Mylène :D

Scuba Diva said...

Although I agree with your purist use of the word "vegan" to mean that you don't consciously use animals in any way, I think this definition has already been watered down to mean "no animal products in your food." Take, for example, Miss New York contestant Davina Reeves, whose health suffered until she gave up meat and dairy. (Or even, lately, Mike Tyson!)

In my opinion, "dietary vegans" or "strict vegetarians" are valid, and moreso than people who choose to eat animal products just because they taste good; or as people have said to me, "I could never be a vegan, because I like to go out with my friends."

I've been following MFIoF and am excited that you're now producing a podcast. Congratulations and I look forward to more!

JayWontdart said...

Excellent! Are you listen on iTunes? I hope I can subscribe and get your future episode. New Vegan podcasts are so exciting!

Mylène Ouellet said...

Trisha and Pao: Thanks so very much! :-)

Jordan: I'm not listed, no. I don't have an iTunes account, which you apparently need to upload your podcast's feed.

Scuba Diva: I agree with you that many have attempted to co-opt the term "vegan" and to alter or water down its meaning. That some (mostly non-vegans) have attempted to shift the word's connotation, however, in no way necessitates embracing this shift. If anything, it's all the more reason to clarify and emphasize the word's true meaning and to reject these attempts others have made to water it down. By definition, there is no such thing as a "dietary vegan" ("strict vegetarian" is more appropriate). And thankfully, the majority of the vegan community recognizes this. The task now is to ensure that the term doesn't become meaningless by letting others redefine it to reflect their continued desire to consume or otherwise use non-human animals.